“Jabba’s Palace” – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood Intarsia

My latest wood intarsia piece: a scene of Jabba’s Palace on Tatooine from “Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi”. I built this from a variety of domestic and exotic woods including mahogany, bubinga, bloodwood, purpleheart, walnut, lacewood, sycamore, and maple. All natural wood colors (NO stains or paints). The frame is bocote with mahogany splines. The work is finished with Tung oil and the frame with polyurethane. This work took several weeks (and many countless hours) to create, and I documented the entire process on my Instagram account. Videos can be seen in my “story highlights” on my profile. I made this for myself. However, I am willing to very reluctantly part with it for $500 if someone just had to have it + shipping. You can buy it HERE.

 

 

  The Making of Jabba’s Palace

from instagram:

After ~7 hours of scrollsawing. My back feels just great! Ha. New Star Wars intarsia project “Jabba’s Palace”. This is how it looks in the warmer living room lights. Actual color is probably between this post and the last. Next up, getting the depth and shapes down with hours of sanding. Lacewood, bloodwood, mahogany, bubinga, purpleheart, walnut, maple, and elm (maybe. It was a half rotten branch I found and milled). See my stories to see me rocking out to @galacticempireofficial (and others) while making it. . . . #starwars #starwarsart #starwarsfanart #woodstarwars #woodart #workinprogress #woodworker #woodworking #intarsia #tatooine #jabbaspalace #binarystar #maytheforcebewithyou #scrollsawart #scrollsaw #madeinpittsburgh #pittsburghmaker #pittsburghwoodworking

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Last shots before the finish (hopefully my Tung Oil will arrive tomorrow. Thanks for all your advice!). I got to break out my 45 degree table saw jig today and rebuild my crappy straight edge jig. I had a really nice piece of bocote wood I bought a while back for 15$ from @woodcraftofpittsburgh. It was slightly warped, so I jointed it with the straight edge jig, ripped it in half lengthwise, and mitered the 45s to make this frame. It’s not actually glued up yet. I was originally gonna router the edges, but I love that grain so much I’m just gonna leave it rectilinear – no distractions. I would have paid probably twice that at least for a decent frame otherwise. Not that anyone sells frames with these weird dimensions anyway. The piece will intentionally poke out of the frame at its thickest depth. Random: the plywood for my 45 jig was set pieces being thrown away by the Pittsburgh Playbouse. The rest was 50 cent scrap from Construction Junction @cjreuse.

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Scrollsaw Nautilus Shell #1 – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Pine

I recently bought a scrollsaw, and as practice I decided to make a nautilus-inspired shell using a method first invented by my cousin Steve Garrison. I started with a really old pine 2″ x 4″ I found in my basement.

(This is the one on top below, also shown with Scrollsaw Nautilus Shell #2 and Scrollsaw Shell #3).

How they were made:

Step 1: cutting wedges (I sued my friend’s miter saw)
Segments were cut on my porter-cable scrollsaw
Individual segments cut from the wedges.
Which were glued together in pairs

Then sanded and shaped with a dremel

 

I stained it with a vinegar/steel wool mix
And made a stand from some scrap

   

“Peregrines Over Pittsburgh,” Daniel D. Brown, 2016, Pastel Pencil

My latest pastel pencil drawing, “Peregrines Over Pittsburgh,” made in August 2016.

I’ve been watching our city’s peregrine falcons for 6 years now, both on webcam as they mate, nest, and raise chicks atop the Cathedral of Learning (seen in the reflection within the eye) and downtown (hence the skyline), as well as in person once the nestlings fledge over Oakland. I consider them to be Pittsburgh’s second avian mascot (behind the Penguin of course) and my favorite creature in the city. Buy prints of this piece HERE.

 

PeregrinesOverPittsburgh_DanielDBrown_2016_600
Peregrines Over Pittsburgh
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PeregrinesOverPittsburgh_DanielDBrown_2016_Detail2_600
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And here is a timelapse video of its creation:

Music: “Acoustic Breeze” http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

“The Workers,” Daniel D. Brown, 2016, Digital

“The Workers” is my latest piece in a series of digital artworks I’ve been creating with the intent of implying fantastical stories with individual beings or groups of beings. It is up to the viewer to create or decipher the story (and so far, I’ve found viewer’s interpretations even more interesting than my own). Also in this series: “The Refugee” and “The Guardian.”

SEND A QUICK MESSAGE IF YOU’D LIKE A PRINT.

I actually created two versions of this piece, and I waver in which I like best. But I believe this one is more conducive to story-telling:

“The Workers”
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And here’s the original version (without the HUD or CRT screen effects).

“The Workers” Original
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“Yoga Bird Pants,” Daniel D. Brown, 2015, Digital

My wife is a part time yoga instructor, so for Christmas this year I designed a pair of avian-themed yoga pants (with yoga “bird” poses included), using Adobe Illustrator. I had them printed through Print All Over Me and I have made my design available for others if you wish to purchase them for yourself. They turned out really nice.

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“Yoga Bird Pants” original design
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Detail (with Crow Pose)
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The estimated layout from the PAOM website. (which is pretty close to identical to the real-life pants on my wife)

“Sentience,” Daniel D. Brown, 2014, Pastel Pencil

I must say, I put more work into this piece than any other I’ve ever done. I literally spent months working on it in short bursts, followed by a couple of weeks of more intense work. I lost count of how many dozens of hours went into it. The reference photo I used was taken by the excellent breast cancer scientist (and my colleague) Dr. Ryan Hartmaier at the Pittsburgh zoo. You can buy prints of this piece HERE.

"Sentience" Daniel D. Brown, 2014, pastel pencil, 11 x 14"
“Sentience”
Daniel D. Brown, 2014, pastel pencil, 11 x 14″
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“Woodstock the Golden Conure,” Daniel D. Brown, 2014, Pan Pastel and Pastel Pencil on Pastelmat

This beautiful bird is a Golden Conure (Guaruba guarouba) named “Woodstock” that resided at the National Aviary.

This piece is 240cm x 300cm (~9.5×12″)

"Woodstock the Golden Conure"
“Woodstock the Golden Conure”
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“Ooh! More nectar!” Rainbow Lorikeet, Daniel D. Brown, 2014, Pan Pastel and Pastel Pencil on Pastelmat

I really got a great bunch of photographs from my most recent trip to the National Aviary with my fiance. Needless to say, they have been a huge inspiration in my pastel drawings. This is one of their famed Rainbow Lorikeets (you can feed them nectar!).

This piece is 240cm x 300cm (~9.5×12”)

I love the look he was giving me.

"Ooh! More nectar!" Rainbow Lorikeet
“Ooh! More nectar!” Rainbow Lorikeet
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“Dexter the Brown Pelican”, Daniel D. Brown, 2014, PanPastel and Pastel Pencil

This is “Dexter.” He lives at the National Aviary (go see him!). It’s my latest pastel pencil drawing. This is on 9.5″ x 12″ PastelMat and drawn with PanPastel and Gioconda Pastel Pencils. I’m pretty stoked with how it turned out!

Original is SOLD.

"Dexter the Brown Pelican"
“Dexter the Brown Pelican”
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“Swallowtail”, Daniel D. Brown, 2013, PanPastel and Pastel Pencil

This is a pastel pencil drawing featuring a swallowtail butterfly scene I captured in a field in central North Carolina near Pilot Mountain.
It’s my second major attempt at PanPastels and Gioconda pastel pencils on PastelMat.

"Swallowtail Butterfly"
“Swallowtail Butterfly”
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“Killer the Green-Winged Macaw”, Daniel D. Brown, 2013, PanPastel and Pastel Pencil

This is “Killer,” a green-winged macaw that resides at the National Aviary. This is my first proper attempt at using PanPastels on PastelMat. I’m fairly happy with how it turned out. It’s based on a photo I took at the National Aviary. You can buy prints of this piece HERE.

The original drawing was SOLD (donated to the National Aviary for the Wings and Wildlife Artshow and Benefit Auction).

"Killer the Green-Winged Macaw"
“Killer the Green-Winged Macaw”
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Barred Owl (Strix varia), Daniel D. Brown, 2013, Pencil

I’ve been fascinated with barred owls since I was a kid. In fact the man who was most influential in me becoming a biologist, Mr. Bob Ross, twice taught me to call these birds in the Ozark Mountains (he was quite an amazing zoology teacher in Arkansas). Their call sounds something like “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?”

"Barred Owl"
“Barred Owl”
"Barred Owl"
“Barred Owl”