Cutting Board Christmas Gift #4 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

I made this cutting board for my wife, partially out of some old branches I found in our old neighborhood, which I finally milled up myself. One was Osage orange (I believe) and one was maple. I also used scraps of walnut and mahogany. It’s already gotten a ton of use!

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Aaaand a cutting board for my wife @tam_a_ryn (and me). This one is actually partially made from a couple large branches I found in our old neighborhood last year. One was a piece of spalted maple and the other I believe might be Osage orange. I got a little benchtop bandsaw for Christmas, so I milled them up, and combined them with some mahogany and walnut for this board. And it’s already seen usage, as you can see in the second pic 🙂 note: I don’t have a planer – so these are all handplaned. I look forward to the day I can get a planer so I can make some cool endgrain patterns. I’m not sure I have the skill to handplane flat enough for the endgrain glue-up step. . . . #cuttingboard #woodworker #woodworking #diykitchen

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Cutting Board Christmas Gift #3 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

Another cutting board I made as a Christmas gift. Made from walnut, cherry, ambrosia maple, and mahogany.

 

Cutting Board Christmas Gifts #1 & 2 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

These are the first two cutting boards I made as gifts. Constructed from scraps of Ambrosia maple, walnut, cherry, & mahogany.

 

 

 

Trivet – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

I had a really old dry branch of what I believe might be Osage Orange (or perhaps locust or something completely different). I decided to make a little trivet/serving board out of it so I can eat from hot dishes in my recliner. Most of its creation is detailed in the multi-image instagram post below. It turned out very functional and fairly beautiful – especially with the live edge.

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I had to wait for some glue to dry today on the lamp project. And the wife is out for ladies’ night. So I decided to make a hot plate/serving tray/cheesboard/whatever out of an old log I picked up out of a neighbors yard almost a year ago. The log looked old and gray when I found it and I’ve been wanting to see what it looks like inside for ages. Now that I built a straight edge jig, I had a way to give it flat sides so I could run it through the table saw. I just made a bunch of 0.5” thick strips and glued them together. That grain is poppin! I still don’t know what kind of wood it is. Thought? Maybe Osage orange. Or locust. Or something completely different. There’s no stain – the wood just has a beautiful yellow/orange hue after finishing with walnut oil.

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Butcher Block Kitchen Island Cart – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

We recently bought a new home that has far too little kitchen space and storage. My wife wanted a kitchen isand with a butcher block, so I built her this. It was my first piece of actual proper furniture, with mortise and tenon joints, a drawer, a hanger for pots and pans, and a shelf for storage. The butcher block top is also removable for cleaning. The butcher block was constructed from ambrosia maple, with the base also in cherry and walnut.

Note: this first instagram post has many different photos (click the arrow).

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Butcher block kitchen island on casters. I did it! I finished my first piece of proper furniture, complete with first attempt at mortise and tenons and a butcher block top. (Not counting the hastily slapped together keyboard stand). I made this for my wife @tam_a_ryn to add a little much-needed kitchen workspace and storage space in our new home. I first deigned it from scratch in SketchUp on my computer. The base is constructed from cherry (#brooksidelumber) while the butcher block top, drawer face, and bottom shelf slats are ambrosia maple (@rockler_woodworking). The drawer handle is walnut (from a nice guy on Craigslist) and the drawer itself is poplar. The hidden drawer support pieces are pine from a shipping pallet. This was also the first time I'd used a router (for the mortises and all the edges) and I'm particularly happy with the routered drawer face. The top is removable for washing and serving, and the shelf is also removable. The butcher block was soaked in mineral oil and conditioned with oil/beeswax (@bedillion.honey.farm) and the base was finished with 3 coats of polyurethane. The pots and pans hang from S hooks attached to an aluminum rod installed underneath (also my first time cutting metal). I was pretty shocked to find that everything fit pretty snugly and is level, despite plenty of errors (luckily my ugly tenons are hidden inside the mortises). This was such an educational experience! Even making my first trip to an actual lumber yard was intimidating at first (what's a "board foot"? lol. Kidding. I studied before I started). I definitely have a newfound appreciation for professional woodworkers and carpenters – and why real furniture is "expensive" compared to particle board Ikea crap. This took me a month on and off to finish.

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Working on my first ever butcher block, which will be the removable top of a kitchen island on casters for my wife. I picked up some gorgeous #ambrosiamaple at half price from @rockler_woodworking. For those curious, ambrosia maple is just maple that has been infected with ambrosia beetles. The beetles have a symbiotic relationship with fungi, which they cultivate on the walls of the galleries they bore in the wood. The beetle's larvae feed on the fungus. The fungus infects the surrounding tree tissue, causing discoloration. And this creates beautiful patterns and figure sought after by woodworkers. And it can kill the tree. #woodworking #butcherblock #cuttingboard #woodworker #diykitchen

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