Cutting Board Christmas Gift #4 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

I made this cutting board for my wife, partially out of some old branches I found in our old neighborhood, which I finally milled up myself. One was Osage orange (I believe) and one was maple. I also used scraps of walnut and mahogany. It’s already gotten a ton of use!

Aaaand a cutting board for my wife @tam_a_ryn (and me). This one is actually partially made from a couple large branches I found in our old neighborhood last year. One was a piece of spalted maple and the other I believe might be Osage orange. I got a little benchtop bandsaw for Christmas, so I milled them up, and combined them with some mahogany and walnut for this board. And it’s already seen usage, as you can see in the second pic 🙂 note: I don’t have a planer – so these are all handplaned. I look forward to the day I can get a planer so I can make some cool endgrain patterns. I’m not sure I have the skill to handplane flat enough for the endgrain glue-up step. . . . #cuttingboard #woodworker #woodworking #diykitchen

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Cutting Board Christmas Gifts #1 & 2 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

These are the first two cutting boards I made as gifts. Constructed from scraps of Ambrosia maple, walnut, cherry, & mahogany.

 

 

 

Tree Table Lamp – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

I’ve been needing a bedside table lamp in our new house for a while now. So I spent over a month designing and building this thing with a whole host of tools and techniques. Needless to say, it was a hell of a learning experience! I detailed pretty much the whole process through instagram (which I do often with my artwork – follow me if you wanna keep up):

My bedside table lamp is complete! It only took me a month. lol. I finished it up with rice paper and polystyrene for the lampshade today. I designed it myself from scratch and constructed it from mahogany and walnut wood scraps and cutoffs (bought for almost nothing on Craigslist). It was made mainly using a @portercable scrollsaw, @dewalttough table saw, @makitatools sander and angle grinder with carving wheel from @kutzall, and a @boschtoolsna router. It’s lit with a #phillipshue white ambience smart bulb. Also, I can control it just by telling Siri on my iPhone what to do, which is more handy than I expected (and works really well). Thanks to my amazing wife @tam_a_ryn for letting me disappear into the workshop far too many nights and weekends for such a simple thing!

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This pile of mahogany is gonna be a lamp base. I hope.

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Lampshade panel 1 of 5 cut (just the interior. The perimeter edges aren’t done).

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Scrolling #scrollsaw

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I often find that the hardest part of a project is just getting my ass off the couch and starting. Especially once it becomes cold and gray here in Pittsburgh. But I succeeded in at least that much today after work. This is the very early beginnings of a bedside table lamp (which I desperately need). Step 1 (not including the initial design in my head and computer) was actually acquiring the wood, which I did a few weeks ago when I majorly scored a carload of mahogany offcuts for $15 from a cool dude who does much more serious furniture work. Step 2 is what you see here. I resawed (very slowly and carefully) the wood into 1/4” strips to glue up as panels. Obviously it won’t make sense yet. You’ll see…

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Cypress the Screech Owl – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood Intarsia

I have been accepted into this year’s Wings & Wildlife Art Show at the National Aviary for the third year in a row. Thus, I decided to creat a piece specifically for the show. During last year’s show, the staff brought around this cute little screech owl around to my booth, where I got some great photos of him (see below). I based this piece on one of those photos.

You can purchase this original wooden artwork here.

If you are interested in making your own version of this piece, the plans can be purchased here.

The following instagram post contains a bunch of photographs going through the entire process of creating these intarsia pieces. Click through to see how it’s done:

Making these #intarsia projects is a long process. Step one is digitally drawing the design. Then I print a bunch of copies, cut out each piece of paper, pick out and purchase the lumber based on color and grain pattern, arrange all the pieces on the wood to get the patterns I want, spray glue all the pieces to the wood (and cover with packing tape to help keep the paper from peeling and lubricate the scrollsaw blade), and then begin the long arduous task of cutting out each piece on a scrollsaw (going through a handful of blades with each piece). This one is gonna be special (and the most complicated one I've made): this is "Cypress" the screech owl, whom I photographed as his handler brought him near my booth at last year's Wings and Wildlife Artshow at the National Aviary.

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