Hairband Bracelet – Daniel D. Brown, 2018, Walnut & Cherry wood

I recently made this hairband bracelet for my wife so that she would look a bit more professional carrying around a hairband on her wrist. Cut with a scrollsaw.

Cutting Board Christmas Gift #3 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

Another cutting board I made as a Christmas gift. Made from walnut, cherry, ambrosia maple, and mahogany.

 

Cutting Board Christmas Gifts #1 & 2 – Daniel D. Brown 2017

These are the first two cutting boards I made as gifts. Constructed from scraps of Ambrosia maple, walnut, cherry, & mahogany.

 

 

 

Tree Table Lamp – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

I’ve been needing a bedside table lamp in our new house for a while now. So I spent over a month designing and building this thing with a whole host of tools and techniques. Needless to say, it was a hell of a learning experience! I detailed pretty much the whole process through instagram (which I do often with my artwork – follow me if you wanna keep up):

My bedside table lamp is complete! It only took me a month. lol. I finished it up with rice paper and polystyrene for the lampshade today. I designed it myself from scratch and constructed it from mahogany and walnut wood scraps and cutoffs (bought for almost nothing on Craigslist). It was made mainly using a @portercable scrollsaw, @dewalttough table saw, @makitatools sander and angle grinder with carving wheel from @kutzall, and a @boschtoolsna router. It’s lit with a #phillipshue white ambience smart bulb. Also, I can control it just by telling Siri on my iPhone what to do, which is more handy than I expected (and works really well). Thanks to my amazing wife @tam_a_ryn for letting me disappear into the workshop far too many nights and weekends for such a simple thing!

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This pile of mahogany is gonna be a lamp base. I hope.

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Lampshade panel 1 of 5 cut (just the interior. The perimeter edges aren’t done).

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Scrolling #scrollsaw

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I often find that the hardest part of a project is just getting my ass off the couch and starting. Especially once it becomes cold and gray here in Pittsburgh. But I succeeded in at least that much today after work. This is the very early beginnings of a bedside table lamp (which I desperately need). Step 1 (not including the initial design in my head and computer) was actually acquiring the wood, which I did a few weeks ago when I majorly scored a carload of mahogany offcuts for $15 from a cool dude who does much more serious furniture work. Step 2 is what you see here. I resawed (very slowly and carefully) the wood into 1/4” strips to glue up as panels. Obviously it won’t make sense yet. You’ll see…

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When the Cows Come Home, Daniel D Brown, 2017 – Mixed Media

This is a sculpture/painting of migrating cownose rays. I made it over the course of a year,  making the actual work a year ago and the frame/base recently. I first laid down a layer of paint on a piece of 4″ x 4″ wood, followed by sequential layers of rays painted on Envirotex Lite resin with acrylic paint (six layers). The final ray was sculpted with apoxie sculpt and the water ripples were made with ModPodge. Finally, I made a base/frame from a chunk of walnut wood, which I sculpted with a dremel.

“When the Cows Come Home” – Daniel D Brown, 2017, Mixed Media

Here is a quick video showinf what the resin part actually looks like in 3D (with light refractions)

 

The light refractions are beautiful when the sun hits it right.
ModPodge ripples

      

Cypress the Screech Owl – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood Intarsia

I have been accepted into this year’s Wings & Wildlife Art Show at the National Aviary for the third year in a row. Thus, I decided to creat a piece specifically for the show. During last year’s show, the staff brought around this cute little screech owl around to my booth, where I got some great photos of him (see below). I based this piece on one of those photos.

You can purchase this original wooden artwork here.

If you are interested in making your own version of this piece, the plans can be purchased here.

The following instagram post contains a bunch of photographs going through the entire process of creating these intarsia pieces. Click through to see how it’s done:

Making these #intarsia projects is a long process. Step one is digitally drawing the design. Then I print a bunch of copies, cut out each piece of paper, pick out and purchase the lumber based on color and grain pattern, arrange all the pieces on the wood to get the patterns I want, spray glue all the pieces to the wood (and cover with packing tape to help keep the paper from peeling and lubricate the scrollsaw blade), and then begin the long arduous task of cutting out each piece on a scrollsaw (going through a handful of blades with each piece). This one is gonna be special (and the most complicated one I've made): this is "Cypress" the screech owl, whom I photographed as his handler brought him near my booth at last year's Wings and Wildlife Artshow at the National Aviary.

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Butcher Block Kitchen Island Cart – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

We recently bought a new home that has far too little kitchen space and storage. My wife wanted a kitchen isand with a butcher block, so I built her this. It was my first piece of actual proper furniture, with mortise and tenon joints, a drawer, a hanger for pots and pans, and a shelf for storage. The butcher block top is also removable for cleaning. The butcher block was constructed from ambrosia maple, with the base also in cherry and walnut.

Note: this first instagram post has many different photos (click the arrow).

Butcher block kitchen island on casters. I did it! I finished my first piece of proper furniture, complete with first attempt at mortise and tenons and a butcher block top. (Not counting the hastily slapped together keyboard stand). I made this for my wife @tam_a_ryn to add a little much-needed kitchen workspace and storage space in our new home. I first deigned it from scratch in SketchUp on my computer. The base is constructed from cherry (#brooksidelumber) while the butcher block top, drawer face, and bottom shelf slats are ambrosia maple (@rockler_woodworking). The drawer handle is walnut (from a nice guy on Craigslist) and the drawer itself is poplar. The hidden drawer support pieces are pine from a shipping pallet. This was also the first time I'd used a router (for the mortises and all the edges) and I'm particularly happy with the routered drawer face. The top is removable for washing and serving, and the shelf is also removable. The butcher block was soaked in mineral oil and conditioned with oil/beeswax (@bedillion.honey.farm) and the base was finished with 3 coats of polyurethane. The pots and pans hang from S hooks attached to an aluminum rod installed underneath (also my first time cutting metal). I was pretty shocked to find that everything fit pretty snugly and is level, despite plenty of errors (luckily my ugly tenons are hidden inside the mortises). This was such an educational experience! Even making my first trip to an actual lumber yard was intimidating at first (what's a "board foot"? lol. Kidding. I studied before I started). I definitely have a newfound appreciation for professional woodworkers and carpenters – and why real furniture is "expensive" compared to particle board Ikea crap. This took me a month on and off to finish.

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Wedding Ring Box – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

     
 

The Original piece of Ambrosia maple

Stormtrooper – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Intarsia

My buddy @scrapforge made me a scribing knife. So I made him this from Cherry and Walnut. 

More shots with various lighting. #woodworking #intarsia #starwars #stormtrooper

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And here are a bunch of views under different lighting conditions: