Bookcase Side Table – Daniel D. Brown, 2018

I’d say that turned out pretty damned close to my original design! This was my first time making something from rough cut lumber. I designed this piece in SketchUp to sit next to our couch, be usable for drinks on the side and knick-knacks on the back, and hold all of Tamaryn’s cookbooks. I built it out of scrap lumber obtained from a furniture maker – these were his cutoffs. The tops are live-edge walnut, the base is ash, and the shelves are walnut and mahogany. The whole thing took roughly three weeks from start to finish. Much of it’s creation was documented with more descriptions on instagram.

 

   

 

Bath Caddy – Daniel D. Brown, 2018

I finally completed this bath caddy for @tam_a_ryn. I think she likes it. It’s inspired by @wilker_dos’s design. I watched her build video a while back for a rough idea and just made something similar on the fly… with only like 5 screw ups or design changes while making it. Ha. It’s made of cherry, walnut, and maple – which was all rough sawn and a little warped Craigslist scrap initially. It was a lot of fun just getting to use my new planer to find some beautiful grain hidden within. The top slats slide to accommodate different devices, and I’ve left the grooves open to “future proof” it (as long as we have this bathtub). I can slide in new panels to fit anything else she wants to take to her bubble bath. 

  

Elm Coat Rack – Daniel D. Brown, 2018

Coat hanger complete! I made this thing out of an old half-rotting log someone was giving away as firewood in Squirrel Hill. I loved the endgrain, which seemed structurally sound enough, and thought it might be pretty inside. So I milled it up with my cheap chainsaw, flattened it with a router/jig, filled the knotholes with epoxy, sanded and sanded, added keyhole slots in the back, added the hardware, and finished it with Arm-R-Seal. I was gonna square it up, but @tam_a_ryn liked the sawed angles from when it was originally cut down. The hooks are staggered because I couldn’t bring myself to cover that beautiful knotted figure. Still not sure what species. Checkout the before and after pics at the end. More of this in my story highlight. Inspired by a similar coat rack made by one of my favorite woodworkers on IG, Matt Plumlee @gotwoodwrkshop.

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Coat hanger complete! I made this thing out of an old half-rotting log someone was giving away as firewood in Squirrel Hill. I loved the endgrain, which seemed structurally sound enough, and thought it might be pretty inside. So I milled it up with my cheap chainsaw, flattened it with a router/jig, filled the knotholes with epoxy, sanded and sanded, added keyhole slots in the back, added the hardware, and finished it with Arm-R-Seal. I was gonna square it up, but @tam_a_ryn liked the sawed angles from when it was originally cut down. The hooks are staggered because I couldn’t bring myself to cover that beautiful knotted figure. Still not sure what species. Checkout the before and after pics at the end. More of this in my story highlight. Inspired by a similar coat rack made by one of my favorite woodworkers on IG, Matt Plumlee @gotwoodwrkshop. . . . #woodworker #woodworking #slabsunday #coatrack #makersgonnamake #madeinpittsburgh

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Three-Legged Stool – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Red Oak and Elm

I found a big chunk of red oak from a tree that was felled near my house in Schenley Park, Pittsburgh a year and a half ago. After letting it sit and dry in my basement all that time, I decided to make a stool out of it. I also had a few elm branches I picked up in a neighbor’s yard around the same time. (side note: I actually started drilling the leg holes early in the summer – and broke my finger in the process. Now that it’s mostly healed, it was time to tackle this bastard).

The original chunk of red oak
The chunk had a large bug hole in it going all the way through the corner, which I decided to fill with epoxy resin, mixed with a tiny bit of green watercolor pigment.

   

Check out that grain!

Butcher Block Kitchen Island Cart – Daniel D. Brown, 2017, Wood

We recently bought a new home that has far too little kitchen space and storage. My wife wanted a kitchen isand with a butcher block, so I built her this. It was my first piece of actual proper furniture, with mortise and tenon joints, a drawer, a hanger for pots and pans, and a shelf for storage. The butcher block top is also removable for cleaning. The butcher block was constructed from ambrosia maple, with the base also in cherry and walnut.

Note: this first instagram post has many different photos (click the arrow).

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Butcher block kitchen island on casters. I did it! I finished my first piece of proper furniture, complete with first attempt at mortise and tenons and a butcher block top. (Not counting the hastily slapped together keyboard stand). I made this for my wife @tam_a_ryn to add a little much-needed kitchen workspace and storage space in our new home. I first deigned it from scratch in SketchUp on my computer. The base is constructed from cherry (#brooksidelumber) while the butcher block top, drawer face, and bottom shelf slats are ambrosia maple (@rockler_woodworking). The drawer handle is walnut (from a nice guy on Craigslist) and the drawer itself is poplar. The hidden drawer support pieces are pine from a shipping pallet. This was also the first time I'd used a router (for the mortises and all the edges) and I'm particularly happy with the routered drawer face. The top is removable for washing and serving, and the shelf is also removable. The butcher block was soaked in mineral oil and conditioned with oil/beeswax (@bedillion.honey.farm) and the base was finished with 3 coats of polyurethane. The pots and pans hang from S hooks attached to an aluminum rod installed underneath (also my first time cutting metal). I was pretty shocked to find that everything fit pretty snugly and is level, despite plenty of errors (luckily my ugly tenons are hidden inside the mortises). This was such an educational experience! Even making my first trip to an actual lumber yard was intimidating at first (what's a "board foot"? lol. Kidding. I studied before I started). I definitely have a newfound appreciation for professional woodworkers and carpenters – and why real furniture is "expensive" compared to particle board Ikea crap. This took me a month on and off to finish.

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Working on my first ever butcher block, which will be the removable top of a kitchen island on casters for my wife. I picked up some gorgeous #ambrosiamaple at half price from @rockler_woodworking. For those curious, ambrosia maple is just maple that has been infected with ambrosia beetles. The beetles have a symbiotic relationship with fungi, which they cultivate on the walls of the galleries they bore in the wood. The beetle's larvae feed on the fungus. The fungus infects the surrounding tree tissue, causing discoloration. And this creates beautiful patterns and figure sought after by woodworkers. And it can kill the tree. #woodworking #butcherblock #cuttingboard #woodworker #diykitchen

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